Lama Zopa on The Potential of the Mind 

The mind is also empty of true existence, of existence from its own side. This quality of mind, known as Buddha-nature, gives us the potential to free ourselves completely from all suffering, including disease, and the causes of suffering and to achieve any happiness we wish, including the peerless happiness of enlightenment. Since the mind has all this potential, we do not need to feel depressed or hopeless. It is not as if we have to experience problems forever. We have incredible freedom to develop our mind in any way that we wish. It is simply a question of finding the right way to use the potential of our mind. ~ Lama Zopa Rinpoche, “Ultimate Healing”

Boundless joy is the joy …

HH Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche at Sakya Ward St Ce...

Image via Wikipedia ~ Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

Boundless joy is the joy you should feel when you see gifted and learned beings who are happy, famous or influential. Instead of feeling uneasy and envious of their good fortune, rejoice sincerely, thinking, “May they continue to be happy and enjoy even more happiness!” Pray too that they may use their wealth and power to help others, to serve the Dharma and the Sangha, making offerings, building monasteries, propagating the teachings and performing other worthwhile deeds. Rejoice and make a wish: “May they never lost all their happiness and privileges. May their happiness increase more and more, and may they use it to benefit others and to further the teachings.”

Pray that your mind may be filled with boundless equanimity, loving-kindness, compassion and joy–as boundless as a Bodhisattva‘s. If you do so, genuine bodhichitta will certainly grow within you.

The reason these four qualities are boundless, or immeasurable, is that their object–the totality of sentient beings–is boundless; their benefit–the welfare of all beings–is boundless; and also their fruit–the qualities of enlightenment–is boundless. They are immeasurable like the sky, and they are the true root of enlightenment.(p.49)

–from The Excellent Path to Enlightenment, by Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

Merely understanding the mind is not good enough.

Merely understanding the mind is not good enough. Recognizing it as the source of happiness and suffering is good, but great results come only from looking inward and meditating on the nature of the mind. Once you recognize its nature, then you need to meditate with joyful effort. Joyful meditation will actualize the true nature of the mind, and maintaining the mind in this natural state will bring enlightenment. This type of meditation reveals the innermost, profound wisdom that is inherent in the mind.

Meditation can transform your body into wisdom light, into what is known as the rainbow body of wisdom. Many masters in the history of the Nyingma lineage have achieved this, as can anyone who practices these methods of meditation. The wisdom aspect of our nature exists at all times in each of us. You have always had this nature and it can be revealed through meditation. When you maintain the mind in its natural state, wonderful qualities shine out like light from the sun. Among these qualities are limitless compassion, limitless loving-kindness, and limitless wisdom. ~ by Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche and Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche, published by Snow Lion Publications

It’s Monday….What are you reading?

What are you reading today?

Some you might know me well enough …that I read several books …or a better wording would be…I have several books going on.

 

I rarely just have one book that I read to exclusion of the others. I will read a little this one and then maybe some of that one…and so it goes.

For the sake of today’s post though….I will only focus on one book that *is* my primary read … No Time to Lose by Pema Chodron. I really enjoy it, her words are simple but profound. I am on Chapter 2. So far…I love it!

So? What are you reading?…and it does not have to be Buddhist reading. 🙂

Namaste…and be well,

Debra

An excerpt from Start Where You Are by Pema Chodron

LIGHTEN UP

Have you ever been caught in the heavy-duty scenario of feeling defeated and hurt, and then somehow, for no particular reason, you just drop it? It just goes, and you wonder why you made “much ado about nothing.” What was that all about?

I’d like to encourage us all to lighten up, to practice with a lot of gentleness. This compassion, this clarity, this openness are like something we have forgotten. Sitting here being gentle with ourselves, we’re rediscovering something. It’s like a mother reuniting with her child; having been lost to each other for a long, long time, they reunite. The way to reunite with bodhichitta (awakened heart) is to lighten up in your practice and in your life.

Start Where You Are By Pema Chodron

Between Misery & Complaints

” It is interesting to me that people don’t see any connection between their misery and their complaints — their feeling of being a victim; the feeling that everyone is doing something to them. It’s amazing. How many times has this connection been pointed out in the dharma talks? How many? And yet because of our fear we won’t look.” ~ Charlotte Joko Beck, Everyday Zen, Love & Work

Fear does many things to us. When fear is valid; it keeps us safe. When it is not valid; it holds us back.  ~ Debra

Book Review: Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom

Rebel Buddha: On the Road to FreedomIn Rebel Buddha, Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche gives us a guidebook for leaving behind the status-quo and becoming the rebel that’s inside you.  No, not like a ‘James Dean’ rebel but a rebel from the world of illusion that we create.  DPR drops all the tradition Buddhist lingo and lays out the path to achieving freedom in a more accessible language.

I have to admit I initially was having difficulty resonating with the book but about halfway it started to click and after re-reading it,  I really appreciate what he wrote much more.  The book offers a challenge to our normal habits, traditions, view of self and practice. It allows us to truly discover the ‘why’ of Buddhism.

What frees us from being stuck?  What cuts through our psychological blockages?  We need the courage of our rebel buddha heart to leap beyond forms, to go deeper into our practice and find a way to trust ourselves.  We must become our own guide.

The book has a wonderful appendix with an incredible explanation of meditation.  He describes mindfulness and analytical meditation practices and how to work with problems during the session.  He ends with some great poems like the following:

You are so creative
And your tricks are so original
Look at your magic
So deceptive, real, and endless

You are a great storyteller
So dramatic, colorful, and emotional
I love your stories
But do you realize that you’re telling them over and over and over?

You are such a dreamer
And you’re tirelessly so passionate
For your dream characters and the world
But do you see that you’re just dreaming

You are so familiar
Yet no one knows who you really are
Are you not called “thoughts” by some?
Are you really there-or simply my delusion

Are you not taught to be the true wisdom mind?
What a beautiful world this could be
If only I could see through this mind.

Well, it doesn’t really matter
Because I don’t exist without you!
“Who am I?” is perhaps the right question
After all, I’m just one of your many manifestations!

review by Digging the Dharma (Philip)