Much of the heaviness…

“The fourth reminder is to awaken lovingkindness. This is the ability to bring nonjudgmental awareness from the heart to the unwanted aspects of “me.”

This reminder can’t be overemphasized. It’s so natural to want to confirm what is most negative about ourselves that we don’t even think about activating compassion or kindness.

In fact, much of the heaviness of our distress comes from the belief that we should be different.

Especially after practicing for a few years, we think we shouldn’t still be so reactive. We think we should be beyond our conditioning. But practice doesn’t work that way.

Yet when we soften our self-judgment with lovingkindness, the sense of drama and heaviness lightens considerably. ” ~ Bursting the Bubble of Fear by Ezra Bayda (Tricycle article) Please read the entire article here . It is well worth your time, at least in my opinion.

I chose this quote because it brought to mind recent conversations. Some of the conversations were with friends and family and some were within myself.

Being gentle & loving with ourselves …we can be gentle & loving with others.

Namaste and Enjoy your moments!

The 28 Day Meditation Challenge…JOIN me in the Challlenge!

Sharon Salzburg has a 28 Day Meditation Challenge …starting in February

Words regarding this event:

‘For the month of February, we have invited a diverse group of people to participate in the meditation program that Sharon Salzberg has laid out in her latest book, Real Happiness. We are asking them to reflect on their experiences—pleasant, difficult, and in between—and let us know how it’s going. They will be blogging and tweeting about their experiences. We will post all of the feedback we receive here on Sharon’s website.’

Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation by Sharon Salzburg

Forgiving and Forgetting

Sometimes we have been holding onto anger or bitterness related to a particular person or event.

Something to think about is: What would I have to give up in order to free myself from this bitterness? We might think, “Well, yes, but what he or she did was absolutely unforgivable.”

Consider the possibility, and I am only saying consider the possibility, that maybe nothing is unforgivable. Maybe there is a way to find forgiveness even for what we have believed for so long to be unforgivable. Explore this mindfully.

To forgive does not necessarily mean to forget. Sometimes to forget is not wise, but to forgive is wise. And it is at times not easy. It can, in fact, be quite challenging.

It will come as no surprise that one of the most difficult people to forgive can be yourself. Yet with patience and gentle determination, it can be done. ~ Allan Lokos