Balancing….

Once we acknowledge the importance of looking within ourselves, we have to elevate our awareness of how our emotions and patterns of behavior affect us. We begin to see the impact on our lives of our emotions, our inner patterns of behavior, and the inner stories that dictate how we see ourselves and the world around us. Becoming aware of these inner forces is key to changing them.  – Lawrence Levy, “Balancing Emotions”

Become Free from Samsara

When you pass away, nothing will do you any good except for the pure Dharma. You will not simply disappear when you die. Rather, what happens next will be dictated by your previous actions.

For these reasons, you should exert yourself by whatever means necessary to free yourself from samsara, which is nothing but a vast ocean of suffering! Practice your teacher’s guidance concerning what to do and what to give up to the letter, without falling under the influence of immature friends or bad influences. To the best of your ability, incorporate this genuine teaching on the certainty of death into each and every day.

Keeping all this in mind, arouse faith in the Three Jewels so that you will be able to practice in this manner, thinking to yourself, “Think of me, Three Jewels!” At the same time, be sure to generate an intense sense of renunciation and subdue your mind stream. ~ Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo.

 

Three Jewels or Triratana in Buddhism.

Three Jewels or Triratana in Buddhism. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Entrance to the Great Perfection: A Guide to the Dzogchen Preliminary Practices, edited and translated by Cortland Dahl, pages 82-83.

 

The Outside…(Buddhism Now)

The outside of people is no clue to what is inside, by Trevor Leggett

 

A well written  post….and worth reading it all.   I was thinking the other day of how one can never know what is inside someone else unless one peers inside. Outside appearances rarely show the inner you or the inner ‘others’.

 

Be well and om mani padme hum…have compassion with yourself.

/|\ Debra

Deutsch: Om mani padme hum (Tibetisches Mantra)

Deutsch: Om mani padme hum (Tibetisches Mantra) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Clarity…

‎”Clarity and emptiness are inseparably united in the true nature of mind, which is beyond all concepts of existence and non-existence.”
Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche.

 

His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche - making ...

His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche – making the perfection mudra and gaze like Padmasambhava, Seattle Sakya Lhakang 1976, Washington State, USA (Photo credit: Wonderlane)

 

 

Sitting quietly…

Sitting quietly, doing nothing, not knowing what is next and not concerned with what was or what may be next, a new mind is operating that is not connected with the conditioned past and yet perceives and understands the whole mechanism of conditioning. It is the unmasking of the self that is nothing but masks—images, memories of past experiences, fears, hopes, and the ceaseless demand to be something or become somebody. – Toni Packer, “Unmasking the Self”

 

*We all have felt the demand to be somebody or something even if we did not realize it was conditioning at the time. Realizing this is a step on the path.* ~ Debra

The Dalai Lama on Compassion… (from 108daysofcompassion.com )

“My message is the practice of compassion, love, and kindness. These things are very useful in our daily life, and also for the whole of human society these practices can be very important.

“Basically, universal responsibility is the feeling for other people’s suffering just as we feel our own. It is the realization that even our own enemy is motivated by the quest for happiness. We must recognize that all beings want the same thing we want. This is the way to achieve a true understanding, unfettered by artificial consideration.

“At the heart of Buddhist philosophy is the notion of compassion for others. It should be noted that the compassion encouraged by Mahayana Buddhism is not the usual love one has for friends or family. The love being advocated here is the kind one can have even for another who has done one harm. Developing a kind heart does not always involve any of the sentimental religiosity normally associated with it. It is not just for people who believe in religions; it is for everyone who considers himself or herself to be a member of the human family, and thus sees things in accordingly large terms.

“The rationale for universal compassion is based on the same principle of spiritual democracy. It is the recognition of the fact that every living being has an equal right to and desire for happiness. The true acceptance of the principle of democracy requires that we think and act in terms of the common good. Compassion and universal responsibility require a commitment to personal sacrifice and the neglect of egotistical desires.

“I believe our everyday experience confirms that a self-centered attitude towards problems can be destructive not only towards society but to the individual as well. Selfishness does not solve problems for us, it multiplies them. Accepting responsibility and maintaining respect for other will leave all concerned at peace. This is the essence of Mahayana Buddhism.” ~ 108daysofcompassion.com

Every Moment…

Every moment in life is absolute in itself. That’s all there is. There is nothing other than this present moment; there is no past, there is no future; there is nothing but this. So when we don’t pay attention to each little this, we miss the whole thing.   ~ Charlotte Joko Beck, “Attention Means Attention”

buddha in mountain

buddha in mountain