Who is our friend? Who is our enemy?

In meditation, imagine that in front of you are three persons—an enemy, a friend, and a neutral person. At that time, in our minds we have (1) a sense of closeness for one of them, thinking, “This is my friend”; (2) a sense of dislike even when imagining the enemy; and (3) a sense of ignoring the neutral person. Now, we have to think about the reasons why we generate these feelings—the reasons being that temporarily one of them helped us whereas the other temporarily harmed us, and the third did neither. However, when we think in terms of the long course of beginningless rebirth, none of us could decide that someone who has helped or harmed us in this life has been doing so for all lifetimes.

When you contemplate this way, eventually you arrive at a point where a strong generation of desire or hatred appears to you to be just senseless. Gradually, such a bias weakens, and you decide that one-sided classification of persons as friends and enemies has been a mistake. ~  His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama, The Dalai Lama at Harvard: Lectures on the Buddhist Path to Peace, page 166
page 166.

Like anyone else….

Like anyone else, I too have the potential for violence; I too have anger in me. However, I try to recall that anger is a destructive emotion. I remind myself that scientists now say that anger is bad for our health; it eats into our immune system. So, anger destroys our peace of mind and our physical health. We shouldn’t welcome it or think of it as natural or as a friend. ~ H.H. The 14th Dalai Lama

Sincere motivation and concern

English: The 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso in...

English: The 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso in Antwerpen, Belgium 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

‎”If you help others with sincere motivation and sincere concern, that will bring you more fortune, more friends, more smiles, and more success. If you forget about others’ rights and neglect others’ welfare, ultimately you will be very lonely.”– the XIV Dalai Lama

Old friends

His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet Answering...

His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet Answering one of the questions that was submitted. His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet Talk For World Peace event in Washington DC July 9 2011, presented by the Capital Area Tibetan Association (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

” Old friends pass away, new friends appear. It is just like the days. An old day passes, a new day arrives. The important thing is to make it meaningful: a meaningful friend – or a meaningful day.”
His Holiness The XIV Dalai Lama

Affection and a Calm Mind

Affection and a calm mind are important to us. A calm mind is good for our physical health, but it also enables us to use our intelligence properly and to see things more realistically. Affection too is important because it counters anger, hatred and suspicion that can prevent our minds from functioning clearly. ~ His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama

Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama with Marco Pannella

Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama with Marco Pannella (Photo credit: Wikipedia)