Sitting quietly…

Sitting quietly, doing nothing, not knowing what is next and not concerned with what was or what may be next, a new mind is operating that is not connected with the conditioned past and yet perceives and understands the whole mechanism of conditioning. It is the unmasking of the self that is nothing but masks—images, memories of past experiences, fears, hopes, and the ceaseless demand to be something or become somebody. – Toni Packer, “Unmasking the Self”

 

*We all have felt the demand to be somebody or something even if we did not realize it was conditioning at the time. Realizing this is a step on the path.* ~ Debra

Letting the mind to become peaceful and…

Letting the mind to become peaceful and staying in meditation state of stillness free from many thoughts is called Shamata or sustained calm. Recognizing the empty nature of the mind within that state of calm is called vipashyana or profound insight. Uniting shamata and vipashyana is the essence of meditation practice.
It is said: Look at the mind, There is nothing to see. Seeing nothing, we see the Dharma, The source of all Buddhas. ~ Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

Inner Nature

Without understanding how your inner nature evolves, how can you possibly discover eternal happiness? Where is eternal happiness? It’s not in the sky or in the jungle; you won’t find it in the air or under the ground. Everlasting happiness is within you, within your psyche, your consciousness, your mind. That’s why it’s important that you investigate the nature of your own mind. ~ Lama Thubten Yeshe

Just sitting…

Just sitting means just that. That ‘just’ endlessly goes against the grain of our need to fix, transform, and improve ourselves. The paradox of our practice is that the most effective way of transformation is to leave ourselves alone. The more we let everything be just what it is, the more we relax into an open, attentive awareness of one moment after another.

~ Barry Magid, “Leave Yourself Alone” 

Metta practice is the cultivation …

English: Buddha's statue located near Belum Ca...

Image via Wikipedia ~ Buddha

Metta practice is the cultivation of our capacity for lovingkindness. It does not involve either positive thinking or the imposition of an artificial positive attitude. There is no need to feel loving or kind during metta practice. Rather, we meditate on our good intentions, however weak or strong they may be, and water the seeds of these intentions. When we water wholesome intentions instead of expressing unwholesome ones, we develop those wholesome tendencies within us. ~ Gil Fronsdal, “May We All Be Happy”